Tribpedia: Ron Paul

Tribpedia

Ron Paul represents Congressional District 14 in Texas. He first served in Congress from 1976-77, then again from 1979-85 and again beginning in 1997.

 

Paul serves on the House Committee on Financial Services, where he is the chairman of the Oversight and Investigations subcommittee. He is also serves on the International Monetary Policy and Trade subcommittee, along  with the  House ...

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How Will Ron Paul Fare in 2012?

Ron Paul shaking hands after a speech on UT Austin campus in 2008.
Ron Paul shaking hands after a speech on UT Austin campus in 2008.

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul has kicked off another presidential campaign, his second attempt at the GOP nomination. Erika Aguilar of KUT News reports on how the libertarian rabble-rouser, whose views often put him at odds with mainstream Republicans, may do in 2012.

Guest Column: The Case for Ron Paul

While television and conservative talk radio continue to marginalize his presidential candidacy, unrest and anxiety over the nation’s economic woes festers, and a passionate and energized base of young people supporting him grows. It's long past time to take him seriously.

Inside Intelligence: Redistricting Will Be...

For the latest installment of our nonscientific survey of political and policy insiders, we asked whether the Legislature will finish its redistricting chores or will need help, whether Republicans will be able to ensure future super-majorities, and how lawmakers will split four new congressional seats between the political parties.

Numbers Tell Tale of Who's Vulnerable in Redistricting

You don't need a new map to find the political trouble spots in Texas. The lists of who's in trouble in redistricting are starting to take shape. Some signs that you're in less-than-perfect shape for political redistricting are your seniority, your party, your race, the growth in your area of the state, the growth elsewhere and, very importantly, your neighbors.

Insiders on the 2012 U.S. Senate Race

For the latest installment of our nonscientific survey of political and policy insiders on issues of the moment, we asked who will succeed Kay Bailey Hutchison in the U.S. Senate, who else might jump into the race, what factors are most likely to affect the outcome and what effect the political maneuvering will have on the legislative session.

Electoral Power is about Voting, Not Population

Lawmakers will spend the next six months drawing political maps for Texas, doing their decennial readjustment to make sure each district has the same number of people. But when they’re done, some parts of the state will still get more political attention than others, and the voters have only themselves to blame.

Texas gained four seats in the 2010 congressional apportionment process, more than any other state.
Texas gained four seats in the 2010 congressional apportionment process, more than any other state.

U.S. Census: Texas Gets 4 New Congressional Seats

Texas won big Tuesday with the release of 2010 census data. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune takes a look at the numbers, which will have legislators redrawing state maps to add four congressional seats.
State Representatives Aaron Pena and Allan Ritter announce their switch to the Republican Party in a press conference at Republican Party of Texas headquarters in Austin.
State Representatives Aaron Pena and Allan Ritter announce their switch to the Republican Party in a press conference at Republican Party of Texas headquarters in Austin.

Now They Have to Win as Republicans

Now that state Reps. Allan Ritter of Nederland and Aaron Peña of Edinburg have ditched the Democrats, attention turns to how they'll hold on to their seats. The former is following a time-tested strategy that has worked for others. The latter is challenging political history.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of Sept. 13, 2010

Ramsey on the fourth University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll (with insights into the statewide races, issues, the budget, and Texans' view of the national scene), Hamilton and Thevenot in Galveston on the anniversary of Hurricane Ike, Ramshaw on secret hearings that separate children from their guardians, Hu on what former state Rep. Bill Zedler did for doctor-donors who were under investigation, Aguilar on the troubles around Mexico's bicentennial, Galbraith talks coal and wind with the head of the Sierra Club, E. Smith interviews state Rep. Debbie Riddle about tourism babies and godless liberals, Grissom on why complaints about city jails go unaddressed, Philpott on the debate that will apparently never happen and Stiles continues to put the major-party gubernatorial candidates on the map: The best of our best from September 13 to 17, 2010.