Tribpedia: Reproductive Health

Women’s reproductive issues in Texas have been much in the news lately, both statewide and nationally. Behind the headlines and the controversies — from the state vs. Planned Parenthood to Planned Parenthood vs. Susan G. Komen for the Cure — are deep-rooted partisan divides, the intersection of faith and policy, even budgetary pressures.

And statistics: According to the 2010 U.S ...

House Committee Quietly Approves Anti-Abortion Bills

After abruptly ending hours of public testimony that went into the wee hours of Friday morning, the House State Affairs committee reconvened on Friday and quietly approved House Bill 60, its companion, Senate Bill 5 — omnibus abortion restriction legislation — and a standlone measure to ban abortion at 20 weeks gestation, House Bill 16.

Interactive: Tracking Texas' Abortion Legislation

Abortion is usually a contentious issue in the Texas Legislature — take last session, when lawmakers passed an abortion sonogram bill and cut family planning funding by two-thirds in an effort to target clinics affiliated with abortion providers. But this session, they have had relatively few public debates on it. Use our interactive to track the progress of abortion-related bills.

A nurse explains to a patient the effects of taking the abortion pill at Whole Woman's Health Surgical Center in San Antonio, Tuesday, March 19, 2013. Proposed state legislation would create greater restrictions on abortion facilities. Only five of the existing facilities offering abortions would meet the standards.
A nurse explains to a patient the effects of taking the abortion pill at Whole Woman's Health Surgical Center in San Antonio, Tuesday, March 19, 2013. Proposed state legislation would create greater restrictions on abortion facilities. Only five of the existing facilities offering abortions would meet the standards.

House Panel Debates Changes to Booklet on Abortion

The House State Affairs committee heard testimony on a bill that would remove language in a state booklet distributed to women seeking an abortion that suggests induced abortion can increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer.

A nurse explains to a patient the effects of taking the abortion pill at Whole Woman's Health Surgical Center in San Antonio, Tuesday, March 19, 2013. Proposed state legislation would create greater restrictions on abortion facilities. Only five of the existing facilities offering abortions would meet the standards.
A nurse explains to a patient the effects of taking the abortion pill at Whole Woman's Health Surgical Center in San Antonio, Tuesday, March 19, 2013. Proposed state legislation would create greater restrictions on abortion facilities. Only five of the existing facilities offering abortions would meet the standards.

Bill Could Reduce Number of Texas Abortion Facilities

A bill advancing through the Texas Legislature could drastically decrease the number of legal abortion facilities in the state. While supporters say Senate Bill 537 will improve women’s safety, abortion rights advocates say the bill is a thinly veiled effort to close 37 of the state’s 42 abortion facilities.

State Rep. Debbie Riddle, R-Houston, speaks in favor of Amendment #5 to SB4 the congressional redistricting bill that would affect a small portion of north Harris County during debate on June 14, 2011.  The amendment was eventually tabled.
State Rep. Debbie Riddle, R-Houston, speaks in favor of Amendment #5 to SB4 the congressional redistricting bill that would affect a small portion of north Harris County during debate on June 14, 2011. The amendment was eventually tabled.

Riddle's Facebook Post Angers Breast-Feeding Moms

Facebook update state Rep. Debbie Riddle, R-Tomball, posted on Tuesday suggesting that mothers should be "modest" while breast-feeding their babies in public has nearly 1,000 comments — most of them outraged. 

 

 

Medical assistant Alesia Bolden checks Nereyda Penaloza's vital signs during a visit to Women's Health at CommUnityCare, a federally qualified health center, in Austin, Texas.
Medical assistant Alesia Bolden checks Nereyda Penaloza's vital signs during a visit to Women's Health at CommUnityCare, a federally qualified health center, in Austin, Texas.

Restoring Family Planning Services Through Primary Care

The fight to restore family planning funding cut from the state budget last session has taken a turn toward primary care. Republican legislators have proposed adding $100 million to a state-run primary care program specifically for women’s health services, which could avert a political fight over subsidizing specialty family planning clinics.

Health Advocates Make Case for Medicaid Expansion

Health care advocates flocked to the Capitol on Thursday to urge the Senate Finance Committee to consider the benefits of expanding Medicaid to impoverished adults, restore funding for family planning services cut last session and encourage redesign of the state’s health delivery system to help additional disabled and low-income Texans.

Newsreel: Women's Health, Guns and the Lege

Texas Weekly

In this edition of the Newsreel: Legislative debate over women's health funding, abortion and Planned Parenthood has started. This week is the 4oth anniversary of the Rove v. Wade ruling. Lawmakers are talking again about guns on campus. And the session is moving into higher gear, with the budget, committees, and the governor's agenda on tap.

Sarah Weddington: The TT Interview

On the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade — the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that legalized abortion — the lawyer who successfully argued the case talks with the Tribune about being a woman in the Texas Legislature during the 1970s, how women’s rights have changed and recent anti-abortion legislation.

Are There Enough Women's Health Program Providers?

This interactive map shows the locations of Planned Parenthood clinics excluded from the new Texas Women's Health Program, overlaid with the non-Planned Parenthood providers that have agreed to treat state-subsidized patients in those areas. A state survey found only two regions in Texas that would lack providers without Planned Parenthood clinics.

Nicole Griffis, nurse practitioner, consults with a patient at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Austin, Texas.
Nicole Griffis, nurse practitioner, consults with a patient at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Austin, Texas.

HHSC: New Women's Health Program Has Enough Providers

The Health and Human Services Commission on Monday said a new survey it commissioned shows the Texas Women’s Health Program has a greater capacity to serve impoverished women than its predecessor, a joint state-federal program that ended after the state moved to exclude clinics affiliated with abortion providers.