Tribpedia: Redistricting

Redistricting is the revision or replacement of existing representative districts. It results in new districts with different "lines" or geographical boundaries. The purpose of redistricting is to equalize population in state and congressional districts after publication of the United States census, and to ensure that minority populations are considered. 

Redistricting in Texas is mandated by the Texas Constitution of ...

Court Cartography

Texas Weekly

Don't expect a redistricting ruling out of San Antonio quickly. Some of the lawyers — and this requires more lawyers than a Hollywood divorce — say the Texas judges might hold their ruling until the DC courts are finished. That could be November, or even December.

Challenge to Texas Redistricting Opens in Federal Court

The state's new political maps for legislative and congressional seats are now in the hands of the federal government. An army of lawyers lined up before the 8 a.m. start of federal redistricting hearings on Tuesday, lugging boxes and boxes of papers and huge three-ring binders, large posters of the state with political maps on them, and briefcases bulging with the scribbled notes and other arguments they'll present over the next two weeks.

Why the Redistricting Lawsuit Matters

Because — as both Democrats and Republicans know well — the drawing of district lines determines the outcomes of future elections. Don't believe it? On the new maps at issue in federal court, only seven of the 150 Texas House races were competitive in 2010.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 8/15/11

Aaronson analyzes TWIA claims and lawyer fees, Aguilar talks border security and voter ID with Chuy Hinojosa, Grissom on the latest inmate exonerated via DNA evidence, Hamilton interviews John Sharp on higher ed and the SEC, Murphy interactively maps the changes wrought by redistricting, Philpott on who's running Texas while Rick Perry is out campaigning for president, Ramsey on Perry's history of off-the-cuff remarks, Ramshaw on Perry's childhood years in Paint Creek, Root on Perry's extraordinary first week on the trail and Tan on even more ways Texas will change on Sept. 1: The best of our best content from Aug. 15-19, 2011.

State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.
State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.

Video: Martinez Fischer, Texas Redistricting on CNN

CNN is anticipating another redistricting showdown in Texas. The Mexican American Legislative Caucus is preparing for a court battle over the newly-passed congressional map, and maintains the four new congressional disrtricts Texas earned through massive population growth over the last decade should better reflect the growth in the state's minority communities. 

With rain pouring down outside the Senate chamber, State Sen. Jeff Wentworth (r), R-San Antonio, speaks with State Sen. Carlos Uresti, D-San Antonio, on May 20, 2011.
With rain pouring down outside the Senate chamber, State Sen. Jeff Wentworth (r), R-San Antonio, speaks with State Sen. Carlos Uresti, D-San Antonio, on May 20, 2011.

Senate Okays Redistricting Commission — for Next Time

Texas Weekly

Now that lawmakers have drawn, approved and sent congressional redistricting maps to the governor for approval, the Senate voted to hand future mapmaking to a bipartisan, non-legislative commission.

Castro To Take On Doggett for New Congressional Seat

The Legislature drew U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett a bad map again this year, so the veteran Democrat will run in the new CD-35 instead. But getting through March’s Democratic primary could be a doozy: Doggett will face State Rep. Joaquin Castro, a 36-year-old rising star in his party who has politics in his DNA, and grew up in one of the San Antonio neighborhoods central to the new district.

The Last Seven Days: A Special Session Update

The Tribune counts down to the end of the special session with updates on where the major issues added to the agenda by Gov. Rick Perry stand. Three weeks in, some bills are headed to the governor's desk. Others have only cleared one chamber. A few are headed to conference committee, where lawmakers will negotiate the differences. And one major unresolved bill threatens to push the House and Senate into yet another special session. 

State Rep. Burt Solomons, R-Carrollton, left, and Rep. Mike Villarreal, D-San Antonio, debating congressional redistricting maps on the House floor on June 14, 2011.
State Rep. Burt Solomons, R-Carrollton, left, and Rep. Mike Villarreal, D-San Antonio, debating congressional redistricting maps on the House floor on June 14, 2011.

House Passes Congressional Redistricting Maps

The Texas House tenatively passed SB 4 on Tuesday afternoon, following nearly four hours of debate in which Democrats argued the congressional redistricting plans under consideration would "ensure" minority voters will lack proper representation in Congress. The bill now heads to third reading, though lawmakers on both sides of the aisle acknowledge the issue is likely to be settled in court.

House Committee on Redistricting Chairman Burt Solomons, R-Carrollton, looks at his committee during a vote on substitute redistricting plans on June 9, 2011.
House Committee on Redistricting Chairman Burt Solomons, R-Carrollton, looks at his committee during a vote on substitute redistricting plans on June 9, 2011.

Redistricting Map On Its Way to Texas House

The Texas House Redistricting Committee approved a new version of the Congressional map that makes a few tweaks, mainly in North and South Texas. But the overall goal remains the same: Maintain and expand Republican power in Washington. The map was sent to the House on a party-line vote. The map could help the re-election prospects of GOP U.S. Reps. Francisco "Quico" Canseco and Kay Granger.

Redistricting: Is There a Better Way?

Tuesday's contentious debate on the state Senate floor over a proposed congressional redistricting map, which passed unsurprisingly on a party line vote, was just a hint of why graduate students at Texas A&M University — and even some lawmakers — are studying alternative ways to handle the process.

Railroad Commissioner Michael Williams announces U.S. Senate candidacy at TribLive on January 27, 2011.
Railroad Commissioner Michael Williams announces U.S. Senate candidacy at TribLive on January 27, 2011.

Michael Williams Soliciting Endorsements for CD-33

Former Railroad Commissioner Michael Williams, who has been running a GOP primary campaign to succeed Kay Bailey Hutchison in the U.S. Senate, has begun actively soliciting endorsements for the congressional seat he intends to seek instead, according to an email obtained Monday night by the Tribune.

Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, discusses congressional redistricting with Sen .Royce West, D-Dallas, (not shown) on the Senate floor Monday, June 6, 2011.
Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, discusses congressional redistricting with Sen .Royce West, D-Dallas, (not shown) on the Senate floor Monday, June 6, 2011.

Texas Senate Approves GOP-Drawn Congressional Map

A new redistricting map, drawn to promote and protect Republican interests in the U.S. Congress, sailed out of the GOP-led Texas Senate Monday. The map, predictably approved along strict party lines, would give Republicans a decent chance of retaining every congressional seat they now hold plus a new one they don't.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 5/30/11

Aaronson and Grissom on a freshman lawmaker who didn't mind making waves, Aguilar on E-Verify's new lease on life, Galbraith on the state's plodding progress toward solar power, Hamilton on Warren Chisum's exit, Philpott on the remapping of Lloyd Doggett's district, Ramsey on a proposed change to ethics laws for Texas pols, Ramshaw on efforts by the state to take control of Medicaid and Medicare, Root on why a Perry presidential bid shouldn't be underestimated, M. Smith on the unraveling of school finance legislation and Tan and Dehn on the highs and lows of the 82nd Legislative Session: The best of our best content from May 30 to June 3, 2011.

U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett shows state district map.
U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett shows state district map.

Imperiled Doggett "Ready to Battle" New Texas Maps

Under a new congressional redistricting map unveiled Tuesday, U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, would lose 60,000 residents who voted for President Barack Obama in 2008. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune talked with Doggett about the proposal, which the longtime congressman said "plunged a dagger into the heart" of Travis County.

Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signed HB 274, which brings lawsuit reforms to Texas courts, including a loser pay system for frivolous lawsuits on May 30th,2011
Gov. Rick Perry ceremonially signed HB 274, which brings lawsuit reforms to Texas courts, including a loser pay system for frivolous lawsuits on May 30th,2011

Updated: The Official Agenda for a New Session

First two items on the call from Gov. Rick Perry: The "non-revenue" and school finance bill, and the Medicaid reforms that were in SB 23. That's where we start, and the governor can add as we go.

The Texas Capitol in the twilight of the 82nd legislative session.
The Texas Capitol in the twilight of the 82nd legislative session.

20 Weeks in Texas in Which the Budget Held Sway

The 82nd Texas Legislature’s regular session ends as it started, with lawmakers arguing about a shrunken state budget and redistricting. With Republicans operating with a supermajority in the House and a commanding majority in the Senate, there was little doubt that the GOP would be able to impose its will. What was new was the power exerted by the Tea Party movement.

Gov. Rick Perry speaks to the press after leaving a school finance meeting between leaders in the House and Senate May 27, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry speaks to the press after leaving a school finance meeting between leaders in the House and Senate May 27, 2011.

Perry: Session on Congressional Maps Possible

Gov. Rick Perry opened the door to a special session on Congressional redistricting — but only if leaders agree to a map in advance. If the Legislature doesn't produce a map, it will fall to the federal courts to produce a new map to adjust for huge population gains.