Tribpedia: Redistricting

Redistricting is the revision or replacement of existing representative districts. It results in new districts with different "lines" or geographical boundaries. The purpose of redistricting is to equalize population in state and congressional districts after publication of the United States census, and to ensure that minority populations are considered. 

Redistricting in Texas is mandated by the Texas Constitution of ...

Texas Capitol
Texas Capitol

The Mother Lode for Redistricting Nerds

Texas Weekly

The Texas Legislative Council has a terrific redistricting section on its website, with full statistical reporting on all of the new maps, including geography, demographics, incumbencies, and election results all the way back to 2002.

Pins and Needles

Texas Weekly

Holiday redistricting stories, not unusual things if you've watched this for a while, always start with three wise persons in the guise of federal judges. It's super-sized this year, with six wise men, three in San Antonio and three in Washington.

Court Releases Congressional Maps

A panel of three federal judges in San Antonio proposed new congressional districts for Texas today. Among the headlines: It looks like U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, and state Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, won't be running against each other.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 11/14/11

Aaronson on the sharp rise in the number of Texans on food stamps, Aguilar investigates the Black Market Peso Exchange, Grissom on the humbling of John Bradley, Hamilton on the tweet heard round the world, Ramsey and Murphy on the newest redistricting maps, Ramsey on why Formula 1 screeched to a halt, Ramshaw and Tan scrutinize Rick Perry's attack on congressional insider trading, Root on Perry's plan for a "part-time citizen Congress" and M. Smith on already ugly State Board of Ed races: The best of our best content from November 14-18, 2011.

Judicial Cartography

Texas Weekly

A panel of federal judges in San Antonio proposed new redistricting maps for the Texas Senate and the Texas House late Thursday, asking for comments by noon on Friday. They're trying to finish maps before candidates start filing on November 28 — a date set by the court.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 9/26/11

Aaronson on the shrinking of state government, Aguilar on the controversy over in-state tuition for the children of undocumented immigrants, Galbraith on Rick Perry vs. the EPA, Grissom on a startling development in a 25-year-old murder case, Hamilton on Ken Starr's first year as president of Baylor, Ramsey on what inmates have to do with redistricting, Ramshaw on the state's crisis in insurance coverage, Root on Perry's presidential grind dance and Smith on obstacles to addressing childhood obesity: The best of our best content from Sept. 26-30, 2011.

An Eye on the Calendar

Texas Weekly

The state probably won't have political maps for federal and state legislators until November and possibly December, crowding the filing-fundraising-campaigning cycle into the holidays and perilously close to the March primaries.

Federal Court to Texas Election Officials: Wait

Election officials in Texas don't have to meet a Saturday deadline for getting their ballots and precinct lines in order, a federal court said Thursday. But with the state's political maps still in limbo, they also didn't get a new set of deadlines to help them get ready for the 2012 elections.

State Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, looks at redistricting maps at a Senate hearing on May 13, 2011.
State Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, looks at redistricting maps at a Senate hearing on May 13, 2011.

In the Map Rooms

Texas Weekly

The Justice Department didn't find fault (put an asterisk here) with the Senate and State Board of Education redistricting maps from Texas, but told a federal court in Washington, DC, that it thinks the maps for the congressional delegation and for the Texas House go backwards in minority representation.

State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.
State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.

The Texas Weekly Index: New Maps Heavily Favor GOP

General elections in Texas will be less competitive than ever under the redistricting maps approved by the Legislature earlier this year. The takeaway is simple: Texas has a strongly Republican map, and the political threats to incumbents, if any, will come in primaries and not in general elections.

State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.
State Rep. John Kuempel, R-Seguin, looks through redistricting maps on display during debate on the House floor on June 14, 2011.

Feds: Proposed Texas Maps Undermine Minority Vote

The new political maps for the Texas House and the state's congressional delegation don't protect the electoral power of the state's minority populations as required by the federal Voting Right Act, the Justice Department said in briefs filed in federal court Monday.

Maps Ensure Melees in March, Peace in November

Texas Weekly

General elections in Texas will be less competitive than ever under the redistricting maps approved by the Legislature earlier this year. The takeaway is simple: Texas has a strongly Republican map and the political threats to incumbents, if any, will come in primaries and not in general elections.

The Texas Weekly Index

Texas Weekly

Lots of things affect election outcomes. Candidates. Money. Issues. Surprises. But some of the results are wired into district maps, through redistricting. Here's our charting of the political atmosphere — Republican or Democratic — in each of the House, Senate and congressional districts drawn by the Legislature this year.