Tribpedia: Matt Angle

Tribpedia

Matt Angle is a Democratic political consultant who serves as the director of the Texas Democratic Trust. He also founded the Lone Star Project, a federal political action comittee. He is based in Washington, D.C.

Previously, Angle served as chief of staff to former U.S. Representative Martin Frost of Texas. 

"Angle isn't a household name to casual ...

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In AG Race, Democrats Hope Houston Gives Paxton a Fight

Democratic nominee for Attorney General, Sam Houston, addresses delegates on the final day of the  2014 Texas Democratic Convention held at the Dallas Convention Center in Dallas, Texas,  June 28, 2014.
Democratic nominee for Attorney General, Sam Houston, addresses delegates on the final day of the 2014 Texas Democratic Convention held at the Dallas Convention Center in Dallas, Texas, June 28, 2014.

Democrats have big hopes for an attorney general candidate named Sam Houston. They believe his Republican opponent, Ken Paxton, is vulnerable because of ethical problems. Paxton’s supporters say Democrats have little cause for optimism.

Dallas DA Campaigns Nationally to Hold Local Seat

Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins won’t go so far as to compare his support to the near-divine fervor of President Obama’s. But Watkins, who gained national prominence for using DNA evidence to exonerate nearly two dozen wrongfully convicted people in one of Texas’ notoriously tough-on-crime jurisdictions, will come close. “It’s a religious experience to vote for Craig Watkins,” Texas’ first African-American D.A. says without irony. Like Obama, he says, other Democratic candidates are “hanging their hats” on his re-election — and on the minority voters he draws to the polls. Like Obama, he’s got “a big target” on his back. “I’ve got to fight the political attacks coming at me from all directions," he insists. “I’ll say it publicly: If you throw punches at us, we’ll drop a bomb on you.”

Redistricting Reality

In 2011, political mapmakers will take the latest census numbers (Texas is expected to have a population of more than 25 million) and use them to draw new congressional and legislative districts. The last time this was done, in 2003, Republican mappers took control of the U.S. House by peeling away seats from the Democrats. This time, Texas is poised to add up to four seats to its congressional delegation — and early numbers indicate bad news ahead for West Texas and other areas that haven't kept up with the state's phenomenal growth.