Tribpedia: Kent Hance

Tribpedia

Kent Hance is the chancellor of Texas Tech University System and a former U.S. Congressman.

Hance, born in Dimmitt, Texas, attended Texas Tech and graduated in 1965. In 1968, he earned his law degree from the University of Texas School of Law, and he returned to Texas Tech to teach law for the next five years. In 1974, Hance ...

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Still at Abbott's Side, Hodge Readies for a New Role

Texas Governor-Elect Greg Abbott introduces Daniel Hodge as interim chief of staff who will oversee the transition team from a Perry administration to an Abbott shop.
Texas Governor-Elect Greg Abbott introduces Daniel Hodge as interim chief of staff who will oversee the transition team from a Perry administration to an Abbott shop.

Little known outside the halls of Texas government, Daniel Hodge, 36, has spent his entire professional career working for Greg Abbott. In so doing, he has become one of state government's more powerful behind-the-scenes figures. That's only becoming more true: He's expected to serve a key role in the incoming governor's administration.

Kent Hance: The TT Interview

The chancellor of the Texas Tech University system on the tier-one race, why the state should invest in higher education and, of course, his thoughts on former head football coach Mike Leach. Hance says that a key role for him in the tier-one race has been raising money and that his political background has served him well in that regard.

Congressman Michael McCaul at the Texas Capitol on Feb. 23, 2011.
Congressman Michael McCaul at the Texas Capitol on Feb. 23, 2011.

You Can't Go Home Again

Texas Weekly

U.S. Rep. Mike McCaul's decision not to run for the U.S. Senate means he won't be testing one of the truisms of Texas politics: A seat in the Texas congressional delegation is a lousy launching pad for statewide office.

TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 1/17/11

The Trib staff on the sweeping cuts in the proposed House budget, Grissom on what's lost and not found at the Department of Public Safety, Galbraith on the wind power conundrum, Hamilton on higher ed's pessimistic budget outlook, Stiles and Swicegood debut an incredibly useful bill tracker app, Ramsey interviews Rick Perry on the cusp of his second decade as governor, Aguilar on a Mexican journalist's quest for asylum in the U.S., Ramshaw on life expectancy along the border, M. Smith on the obstacles school districts face in laying off teachers and yours truly talks gambling and the Rainy Day Fund with state Rep. Jim Pitts: The best of our best from January 17 to 21, 2011.

Texas University Chancellors Brace for Budget Cuts

Every chancellor of a university system in Texas knows — down to the exact, excruciatingly precise percentage point — how much worse higher education fared than other agencies when their current budgets were cut. With the state facing a massive budget shortfall in the next biennium, the chancellors know they're in for another round. But this time they're adamant that they not bear a disproportionate share of the pain.

State Representatives Aaron Pena and Allan Ritter announce their switch to the Republican Party in a press conference at Republican Party of Texas headquarters in Austin.
State Representatives Aaron Pena and Allan Ritter announce their switch to the Republican Party in a press conference at Republican Party of Texas headquarters in Austin.

Now They Have to Win as Republicans

Now that state Reps. Allan Ritter of Nederland and Aaron Peña of Edinburg have ditched the Democrats, attention turns to how they'll hold on to their seats. The former is following a time-tested strategy that has worked for others. The latter is challenging political history.