Tribpedia: John Carona

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Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott speaking before a NE Tarrant Tea Party meeting at the Concordia Lutheran Church in Bedford TX. Abbott is seeking to become the next governor of Texas.
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott speaking before a NE Tarrant Tea Party meeting at the Concordia Lutheran Church in Bedford TX. Abbott is seeking to become the next governor of Texas.

The Evening Brief: Texas Headlines for Nov. 26, 2013

Your evening reading: gun advocates find hope in Abbott's open-carry proposal; O'Rourke stock purchase might have broken new restrictions; IRS issues new guidelines to squeeze dark-money groups

Gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott speaks at a NE Tarrant Tea Party meeting at Concordia Lutheran Church in Bedford.
Gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott speaks at a NE Tarrant Tea Party meeting at Concordia Lutheran Church in Bedford.

Abbott Proposes Far-Reaching Ethics Reform

Ethics watchdogs are applauding gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott for proposing what would amount to a sea change in Texas ethics laws. The attorney general has introduced a policy proposal that would institute new criminal penalties for self-dealing and put more sunlight into disclosure and campaign finance laws.

Reverse Mortgage Plan's Fate is in Voters' Hands

Proposition 5, which will be up to voters in November, would let Texas seniors use reverse mortgages for purchasing new residences. Proponents say that hundreds of thousands of people could benefit from the measure. But some observers warn that if the amendment passes, seniors shouldn’t assume that a reverse mortgage is their only option when buying a new home.

Sen. John Carona.
Sen. John Carona.

For John Carona, Conflicts and Interests

The constitutional provision of a part-time Legislature whose members have full-time jobs back home limits the power of state government but blurs the line between public responsibilities and personal ambition — as the story of a rich and powerful state senator from Dallas illustrates.

State Rep. John Carona holds up his right hand during his first swearing-in ceremony for the 72nd Legislature on January 8, 1991.
State Rep. John Carona holds up his right hand during his first swearing-in ceremony for the 72nd Legislature on January 8, 1991.

Slideshow: John Carona Through the Years

Take a photographic trip through Sen. John Carona's career in the Texas Legislature, from his swearing in as a freshman House member in 1991 to his chairmanship of the powerful Senate Committee on Business & Commerce. 

Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, at a press conference April 8, 2013 calling for another push to legalize casino gambling in Texas.
Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, at a press conference April 8, 2013 calling for another push to legalize casino gambling in Texas.

Amended Payday Lending Bill Passes Senate

UPDATED: A heavily amended bill to regulate short-term lenders passed the Senate on Monday night, but it faces an uphill battle in the House. As the amendments piled on, the measure's author, state Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, began to treat them with a sense of resignation. "I'll leave it to the will of the body," he said. "I just want to go home and feed my cat." 

Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, at a press conference April 8, 2013 calling for another push to legalize casino gambling in Texas.
Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, at a press conference April 8, 2013 calling for another push to legalize casino gambling in Texas.

Carona Sets the Stage for Hearing on Gambling Measure

"You never really know when a major issue like this will find a break or an opportunity to be passed," state Sen. John Carona said Monday about proposed legislation that could legalize casino gambling in Texas.

Lawmakers to Again Take Aim at Predatory Lending

The Legislature will have another go at fighting the practices of some payday lenders and auto-title loan businesses, which critics say often prey on vulnerable Texans. Legislators last session passed a law allowing more oversight of such businesses, but a more comprehensive bill did not pass.