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Dallas Hospital Apologizes for "Mistakes" in Ebola Care

Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.
Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

A representative of the Dallas hospital under scrutiny for its handling of the first Ebola case in the United States apologized on Thursday for mistakes he said the facility made when it initially misdiagnosed the patient.

 

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins during "All Transportation is Local," part of The Texas Tribune Transportation Symposium on Oct. 17, 2013.
Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins during "All Transportation is Local," part of The Texas Tribune Transportation Symposium on Oct. 17, 2013.

Ebola Response Puts Jenkins in Spotlight, Again

After the first case of Ebola in the U.S. was confirmed in Dallas, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins has been thrust into the national spotlight. It is not the first time Jenkins has been on such a stage, as he has not shied from speaking out on hot-button issues during his time in office.

Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person in the United States diagnosed with the Ebola virus, died in Dallas, Texas on Oct. 8, 2014.
Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person in the United States diagnosed with the Ebola virus, died in Dallas, Texas on Oct. 8, 2014.

Dallas Ebola Patient Dies, Hospital Says

A week after the first Ebola case in the U.S. was confirmed at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, the patient, Thomas Eric Duncan, died Wednesday morning, hospital officials said.

Texas Women Seeking Abortions May Look to Their Doctors

When federal appellate judges ruled last week that the state could enforce strict new abortion restrictions while a legal challenge winds its way through the courts, Texas was left with just eight abortion clinics authorized to perform the procedure. While many Texas women now live hundreds of miles away from such facilities, some may still have another option: their doctor’s office.

A day after a federal appeals court allowed Texas to begin enforcing new abortion restrictions, a group protested the ruling on the South Steps of the Texas Capitol building.
A day after a federal appeals court allowed Texas to begin enforcing new abortion restrictions, a group protested the ruling on the South Steps of the Texas Capitol building.

Abortion Providers Ask U.S. Supreme Court to Review Decision

Days after a federal appeals court ruled that the state could enforce new requirements for abortion facilities as the case against the restrictions makes its way through the appeals process, Texas abortion providers are looking to push the case up to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.
Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

Texas Officials' Ebola Contact Investigation Expands

Texas health officials have expanded to 100 their list of people who may have had contact with a man in the Dallas area confirmed to be infected with the Ebola virus. Eighteen people are already under observation.

 

 

Interactive: 2013 Rates of Uninsured Across Texas

Use this interactive, which contains 2013 figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, to compare the rates of uninsured Texans in each of the state's metropolitan statistical areas. The direct impact of the federal Affordable Care Act remains to be seen, as insurance plans purchased through the ACA marketplace did not go into effect until January 2014. 

Chris Ornelas, a Texas Organizing Project employee, speaking with Armando Rodriguez while canvassing in San Antonio's west side on Sept. 4, 2014.
Chris Ornelas, a Texas Organizing Project employee, speaking with Armando Rodriguez while canvassing in San Antonio's west side on Sept. 4, 2014.

In Health Care, Organizers Find Issue to Spur Hispanics

In three of Texas' most populous counties, organizers are working to use Hispanic support of affordable health care to spur a movement they think could change the state’s electoral tide. Republicans suggest the issue ranks far behind unemployment and the economy — areas where they say their policies have the market cornered.   

 

For Many Texans, "Miracle" Economy Doesn't Apply

State leaders often tout the so-called Texas miracle – the idea that the state’s economy is thriving thanks to their small-government approach. But with poor health coverage, low wages and limited academic success, not everyone benefits. Here are the stories of six Texans who have worked tirelessly, but found little relief in the Texas miracle.

Iraqi refugee Mohammed al Mamoori used a Foundation Communities program, Insure Central Texas, for help signing he and his family up for health insurance earlier this year.
Iraqi refugee Mohammed al Mamoori used a Foundation Communities program, Insure Central Texas, for help signing he and his family up for health insurance earlier this year.

Glitches Threaten ACA Coverage for Some Immigrants

Immigrants who purchased health insurance through the federal marketplace could lose their coverage next month if they cannot verify their citizenship records, highlighting the challenges of signing up individuals who have recently become U.S. citizens or residents.

An abortion procedure room at the Whole Woman's Health ambulatory surgical center in San Antonio.
An abortion procedure room at the Whole Woman's Health ambulatory surgical center in San Antonio.

Arguments Wrap Up in Trial Over Abortion Restrictions

UPDATED: Attorneys in the trial over ambulatory surgical center requirements for abortion facilities wrapped up their closing arguments Wednesday morning. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel said he would issue a ruling "as quickly" as possible, though an exact date wasn't given. 

 

Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.
Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion.

Houston Medical Center Considers Ways to Prevent Ebola

The Baylor College of Medicine in Houston is considering a reverse quarantine that would keep health staffers from patients for 21 days after they have traveled to countries affected by the Ebola outbreak.

A hallway at the Whole Woman's Health clinic in Austin. The organization announced the clinic was shutting down Thursday, July 31.
A hallway at the Whole Woman's Health clinic in Austin. The organization announced the clinic was shutting down Thursday, July 31.

Opening Statements Made in Trial Over Abortion Regulation

UPDATED: Attorneys made their opening arguments Monday in a U.S. district court trial over a provision that requires abortion facilities to meet the same regulations as ambulatory surgical centers. Attorneys for abortion providers who filed suit also called several witnesses in the trial, which is scheduled to last through Thursday.

Patients are shown checking out in 2010 at the People's Community Clinic in Austin, a safety-net clinic that serves Medicaid recipients and the underinsured.
Patients are shown checking out in 2010 at the People's Community Clinic in Austin, a safety-net clinic that serves Medicaid recipients and the underinsured.

Rule Changes Address Contraceptive Devices

Texas women who receive state-financed health services may be able to more easily access contraceptive products like intrauterine devices and hormonal implants beginning Friday, when rule changes to the state’s Medicaid program and the Texas Women’s Health Program go into effect.