Tribpedia: Center for Public Policy Priorities

Tribpedia

The Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that evaluates and promotes social and economic policies on the basis of how they benefit Texans with low and moderate income.

The CPPP divides its work into the following categories: - Economic development - Access to public benefits - Child protection - School finance - State and federal tax and budget analysis ...

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Report: Texas Lags on Child Well-Being

School children at Arnoldo Cantu Sr. Elementary School in San Juan, Texas, enjoy their free breakfast, April 24, 2013.
School children at Arnoldo Cantu Sr. Elementary School in San Juan, Texas, enjoy their free breakfast, April 24, 2013.

Texas ranks among the 10 worst states on a variety of indicators of child well-being, according to a new national analysis out Tuesday. The state fares particularly poorly on “family and community” measures, like the percentage of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods.

Surplus Projections Ignite a Familiar Debate

With expectations that state lawmakers will have a budget surplus of several billion dollars, lawmakers, activists and business groups are already discussing what to do with the money. While some are arguing for tax relief, others say the state has unmet needs in transportation and education that need to be addressed.

Gov. Rick Perry lunches with business leaders at the Star Restaurant in Dubuque, Iowa, on Aug. 16, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry lunches with business leaders at the Star Restaurant in Dubuque, Iowa, on Aug. 16, 2011.

Perry Campaign Hoping for Good News in Texas Jobs Report

The latest Texas jobs numbers will be released today, and a positive report would bolster Gov. Rick Perry's economic message on the campaign trail. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports on the battle to define just how well the Texas economy is doing.

Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Iowa State Fair during a campaign stop on Aug. 14, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Iowa State Fair during a campaign stop on Aug. 14, 2011.

Perry and the Stimulus: It's Complicated

In his book and on the campaign trail, Rick Perry rails against the Obama administration's "failed" 2009 federal stimulus program. But the governor and state lawmakers took more than $17 billion in fed-stim funding, including $8 billion of the one-time dollars to cover recurring state expenses. In fact, Texas used the stimulus to balance the current biennium's budget — and the one before that.

Tax Panel Considers Making $1M Exemption Permanent

The House Ways & Means Committee is considering several bills that have the same mission: to make permanent the franchise tax exemption for businesses that report $1 million or less in gross revenue.

The exemption has been in place since 2008. It is scheduled to expire in September and go down to $600,000; businesses that make less than that would be exempt, while those making more would pay the tax. If that happens, the head of the Texas chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business told the committee that nearly 28,000 businesses would be added to the tax roll.

Sen Steve Ogden, R-Bryan, President Pro-Tempore of the Senate, speaks to colleagues on April 6, 2011.
Sen Steve Ogden, R-Bryan, President Pro-Tempore of the Senate, speaks to colleagues on April 6, 2011.

Will Hospitals Be Taxed to Prop Up Medicaid?

Talk has resumed in the Senate — albeit quietly — about a so-called “quality assurance fee,” a revenue generator that would effectively tax hospitals to prop up the state’s cash-strapped Medicaid program.

New Day Rising: The Changing Public Policy Landscape

At the Tribune's New Day Rising symposium on Feb. 28, four public policy experts — Talmadge Helfin of the Texas Public Policy Foundation, Rebecca Bernhardt of the Texas Criminal Justice Coalition, Jerel Booker of Stand for Children Texas and Eva DeLuna Castro of the Center for Public Policy Priorities — talked about criminal justice, education, health care and other issues that will be impacted by the coming Hispanic majority.

State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Simonton, at TribLive on February 23, 2011.
State Rep. John Zerwas, R-Simonton, at TribLive on February 23, 2011.

Audio: A Conversation About Health Care

For our latest TribLive event, I talked about federal health care reform and the consequences of the state's budget shortfall on health and human services programs with state Rep. John Zerwas, R-Simonton, Anne Dunkelberg of the Center for Public Policy Priorities and Tom Banning of the Texas Academy of Family Physicians.

Liveblog: Reform or Bust?

We liveblogged this morning from the Austin Club, where the subject of today's TribLive was health care: Reform or Bust? The topics of conversation: the costs — and solutions — for Medicaid, payment reform in Texas vs. the federal health overhaul, and what kind of hit Texas' neediest patients will take in budget cuts.

What They'd Do About the Budget Shortfall

Everyone has an opinion about the budget shortfall: how big it is, what cuts we should make to confront it, whether new taxes — or new revenue of any kind — can be employed as a stop-gap. We asked three big thinkers in the Capitol community to tell us what they'd do if they had the power to take on the shortfall themselves.

Looming Budget Cuts Worrying Children's Advocates

The budget draft filed last week provided the first glimpse at the kind of deep cuts that state agencies could see in the next biennium. As Matt Largey of KUT News reports, advocates are particularly worried about what the final budget could hold for the agency that protects children from abuse and neglect.

Some Eying Sales Tax Increase to Plug Budget Hole

It's not hard to find strange bedfellows in the Texas Legislature when the bills start flying. Republicans and Democrats frequently cross the aisle to support legislation that they feel will help their constituents. As Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports, the same could be true as lawmakers try to figure out how to balance the state budget during the upcoming legislative session.

Some Eying Sales Tax Increase to Plug Budget Hole

It's not hard to find strange bedfellows in the Texas Legislature when the bills start flying. Republicans and Democrats frequently cross the aisle to support legislation that they feel will help their constituents. As Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports, the same could be true as lawmakers try to figure out how to balance the state budget.  

Texas Lawmaker Pushes to Call Fees Taxes

Republican leaders in the Texas Legislature are insisting that it will be a no-new-taxes session. In response, one Democratic lawmaker is pushing to expand the definition of the word "taxes" to include fees. Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports.