Tribpedia: Bill Hammond

Tribpedia

Bill Hammond is lobbyist and former state lawmaker. Hammond is president and CEO of the Texas Association of Business, the largest business organization in the state.

He spent eight years in the Texas House of Representatives. He ran a statewide campaign for the 3rd Congressional District in 1991. In his tenure, Hammond has opposed state policy involvement in immigration and ...

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The Texas Association of Business erected a billboard for the day in Austin highlighting the failure of colleges and universities to graduate students with degrees or certifications.
The Texas Association of Business erected a billboard for the day in Austin highlighting the failure of colleges and universities to graduate students with degrees or certifications.

Graduation-Rates Campaign Heads to Dallas

A new billboard that will tower over Dallas' North Central Expressway on Monday offers a startling message on college graduation rates, an effort by a state business group to turn the spotlight on the the state's lagging higher ed outcomes.

Students on the University of Texas at Austin campus.
Students on the University of Texas at Austin campus.

Higher Ed Standstill

Texas Weekly

Heading into the regular session, conservative business leaders like Woody Hunt and Bill Hammond were leading the charge for higher education reform. Their proposals for getting more graduates in the state included funding for colleges and universities tied to graduation rates instead of enrollments, a distribution method for financial aid that favored high-achieving needy students.

Guest Column: How to Bridge the Budget Gap

As the clock counts down to the end of the regular session on May 30, it’s fair to ask House and Senate leaders — and all members — to meet our needs, not our wants. Here's how they can bridge the multi-billion-dollar gap between their budget plans without any new taxes.

Demonstrators stand in front of the Texas Capitol on Feb. 22, 2011 to show their opposition to immigration legislation.
Demonstrators stand in front of the Texas Capitol on Feb. 22, 2011 to show their opposition to immigration legislation.

For Republicans, the Hazards of Red Meat

The growth of the state’s Hispanic population and the rise of immigration as a political issue put Texas Republicans in a tight spot — especially the ones with statewide aspirations.

Texas Battle Over Rainy Day Fund Heating Up

Texas, like many other states, is proposing billions of dollars in cuts to help close a budget gap. But as Ben Philpott of KUT News and the Tribune reports, one thing Texas has that nobody else does is $9 billion in a piggy bank called the Rainy Day Fund — and lawmakers are divided over whether to crack it open.

Business Leaders Sound Alarm About Education Cuts

Lawmakers will soon take an ax to the state budget, but business leaders are hoping one big-ticket item will be spared. At its annual conference in Austin this week, the Texas Association of Business sounded warnings about potential cuts to public education. Erika Aguilar of KUT News reports.

An estimated 25,000 demonstrators attended the rally in Dallas to advocate for comprehensive immigration reform on May 1, 2010.
An estimated 25,000 demonstrators attended the rally in Dallas to advocate for comprehensive immigration reform on May 1, 2010.

Unlikely Groups Ally to Oppose Immigration Laws

Proposing state enforcement of immigration laws can produce strange bedfellows. "Who would imagine that after 28 years of law enforcement the ACLU would be talking so nicely about me,” Sheriff Richard Wiles joked after being introduced as a common-sense sheriff by ACLU of Texas Executive Director Terri Burke for his opposition to proposed legislation patterned on Arizona’s.

Newly-elected state Rep. David Simpson at the head of the line to prefile bills on Nov. 8, 2010.
Newly-elected state Rep. David Simpson at the head of the line to prefile bills on Nov. 8, 2010.

TX House Bills Would Crack Down on Illegal Immigration

Republican state lawmakers, buoyed by their party’s resounding victories on Election Day, have filed several bills ahead of the next legislative session that signal how far they're willing to go in tackling illegal immigration. State Rep. Debbie Riddle, R-Tomball, filed a nine-bill bundle that included a proposal to require picture IDs at polling places.

Texans Want Tighter Controls on Immigration

Texans narrowly oppose a "pathway to citizenship" for illegal immigrants, strongly favor an end to in-state tuition for non-citizens at state colleges and universities, would support a constitutional "English-only" amendment and overwhelmingly say that businesses should verify the immigration status of their workers, according to the new UT/Texas Tribune poll.

What Texas Should Do About Business

To restore jobs lost during the recession and to prepare for those ready to enter the job market, Texas must create more than two million jobs in the next decade. A key factor in achieving this target is having educated employees available to fill positions as they become available.