Tribpedia: 2010 Primary Elections

Tribpedia

The 2010 primaries for the Democratic and Republican parties were held on March 2, with runoffs in races that required them coming on April 13. The winners proceed to the general election on November 2, where all candidates — Libertarians, Independents, write-ins, Democrats and Republicans — all get a chance to win voter approval.

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Court Stays the Course on Politics and Business

Corporations and unions can play in politics, but a full disclosure is not required. A corporate political campaign in East Texas two years ago was unusual, featuring an unknown corporation that was open about what it was doing when it ran ads that targeted a state legislator.

Treemap Reveals Campaign Ad Trends

Since The Texas Tribune launched in November 2009, the Ads Infinitum blog has collected and posted political advertisements — more than 70 in all — from candidates in both parties running for various offices during the primary and general election campaigns. We recently went back and collected data on all the ads we've posted and created a treemap data visualization so readers could sort them across categories. Transcripts of the ads and the videos themselves are also available via an interactive table. View the treemap and a video tutorial on how to use it. 

BIll White, Rick Perry at their Primary 2010 reception speeches.
BIll White, Rick Perry at their Primary 2010 reception speeches.

Sheriffs Endorsements Similar to 2008 Results

Most of the gubernatorial endorsements today by Texas sheriffs — though not all — map to the 2008 presidential election results. 

The KDR Development Inc. advertisement that ran in the Panola Watchman
The KDR Development Inc. advertisement that ran in the Panola Watchman

The First Corporate Ad

The first political ads bought by a corporation in Texas appeared in East Texas newspapers just weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court effectively ended the state's ban on that kind of spending. They challenged the Republican bona fides of state Rep. Chuck Hopson of Jacksonville, a Democrat who switched parties in November and ran in a three-way GOP primary.

Yancy Isn't Done

Darren Yancy, who came in second in a Senate race against a guy who doesn't want the job, says he'll be a candidate in the special election for the Waco seat held by Kip Averitt.

Data App: How Much Texas Candidates Paid Per Vote

Was Farouk Shami, in fact, "on fire"? The Democratic gubernatorial candidate burned through campaign cash, spending $135 for every vote he received in Tuesday's primary on the way to getting trounced by Bill White — more than any other candidate on the ballot, and by far the most of any losing candidate. By contrast, Democratic land commissioner hopeful Bill Burton spent only 2 cents per vote in a narrow loss to Hector Uribe, who spent only 7 cents per vote himself. All told, candidates spent, on average, about $14 per vote. Explore each campaign's bang for the buck in our latest data application.

BIll White, Rick Perry at their Primary 2010 reception speeches.
BIll White, Rick Perry at their Primary 2010 reception speeches.

With Primaries Over, Start the Race for Governor

The real gift to Gov. Rick Perry on Tuesday wasn't the win over Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison and Debra Medina in the GOP primary, which was foretold in the polls. It was the quick win. A runoff would have gobbled six weeks and something like $10 million and might have left the winner bruised on the way into a battle with Democrat Bill White, who easily bested six others in his party's primary. So how does November look from here?

Don McLeroy, a member of the Texas State Board of Education, at the Texas Tribune offices in October.
Don McLeroy, a member of the Texas State Board of Education, at the Texas Tribune offices in October.

Christian Conservatives Lose Former SBOE Chair

The State Board of Education likely won't be quite as much of a Christian Conservative flash point any more. What it will be, however, is anybody’s guess.

More Results of the March Primary

Despite their best efforts, several of Tuesday’s candidates couldn’t pull off the needed majority vote to avoid a runoff six weeks from now on April 13. Meanwhile, some voters already know who’s going to the Legislature to represent them in 2011, because the victors face no general election opponents.