Texas School Finance Trial

The school finance trial involving more than two-thirds of Texas school districts and most of its charter schools kicked off Oct. 22. It is the sixth time in the last 40 years that Texas has had to address how it funds public schools — but there are new players in the courtroom this time, including a recently formed organization representing business interests and school choice advocates.

To keep track of what is sure to be the lawsuit's lengthy journey through the court system, we've collected all of our coverage, from the battles of the last legislative session to the latest developments in the case.

Here, you'll find links to the latest updates from The Texas Tribune and other news outlets, as well as our extensive guides to the state's school finance system and the legal arguments from all six parties in the case.

Analysis: Texas Schools, by the Numbers

A reading assistant reads on the classroom floor with a small group of fourth graders at Wanke Elementary School in San Antonio on March 9, 2012.
A reading assistant reads on the classroom floor with a small group of fourth graders at Wanke Elementary School in San Antonio on March 9, 2012.

You can peek at the state’s near future in the latest numbers from the Texas Education Agency: 51.8 percent Hispanic, 29.4 percent Anglo, 12.7 percent African-American, 3.7 percent Asian.  And 29 percent of the state’s students are enrolled in just 18 of the state's school districts.

Analysis: Does "Voucher" Label Fit the Bill?

You can slow down or even kill a piece of legislation with a single word or phrase, if it's poisonous enough. One such loaded word is "voucher." Critics are using that term to describe a school scholarship proposal that has won the Senate's approval. But backers say the proposal is a tax credit and not the kind of voucher program that seems to merit automatic dismissal from lawmakers.