Texas School Finance Trial

The school finance trial involving more than two-thirds of Texas school districts and most of its charter schools kicked off Oct. 22. It is the sixth time in the last 40 years that Texas has had to address how it funds public schools — but there are new players in the courtroom this time, including a recently formed organization representing business interests and school choice advocates.

To keep track of what is sure to be the lawsuit's lengthy journey through the court system, we've collected all of our coverage, from the battles of the last legislative session to the latest developments in the case.

Here, you'll find links to the latest updates from The Texas Tribune and other news outlets, as well as our extensive guides to the state's school finance system and the legal arguments from all six parties in the case.

Texas Public Schools Are Poorer, More Diverse

Schoolchildren watch the Veterans Day parade on Congress Avenue on Nov. 11, 2015.
Schoolchildren watch the Veterans Day parade on Congress Avenue on Nov. 11, 2015.

The makeup of the Texas public school system has become less white and poorer in recent decades, according to the most recent data from the Texas Education Agency reflected in The Texas Tribune’s Texas Public Schools Explorer. It’s a change that’s largely attributable to massive growth in the state’s Hispanic and Asian populations.

Experts: Expect Early 2016 School Finance Ruling

Texas Supreme Court Justices Paul Green, left, and Chief Justice Nathan Hecht listen to oral arguments Sept. 1 in Texas' appeal of a 2014 ruling that struck down its system of funding public schools as unconstitutional.
Texas Supreme Court Justices Paul Green, left, and Chief Justice Nathan Hecht listen to oral arguments Sept. 1 in Texas' appeal of a 2014 ruling that struck down its system of funding public schools as unconstitutional.

Citing past rulings and politics, experts and insiders are predicting the Texas Supreme Court will rule in the latest school finance appeal early next year with some predicting a special legislative session.

State Asks Supreme Court to Drop School Finance Lawsuit

Texas Solicitor General Scott Keller addresses the state Supreme Court on Tuesday. The state's highest civil court agreed to hear the state's appeal of a 2014 lower court ruling that struck down the state's method of funding public schools as unconstitutional. (AP/Eric Gay)
Texas Solicitor General Scott Keller addresses the state Supreme Court on Tuesday. The state's highest civil court agreed to hear the state's appeal of a 2014 lower court ruling that struck down the state's method of funding public schools as unconstitutional. (AP/Eric Gay)

“Money isn’t pixie dust” when it comes to improving public schools, lawyers for the state of Texas told the state Supreme Court on Tuesday, arguing an appeal in what has been described as the most far-reaching school finance case in state history. They urged the high court to either dismiss or remand the lawsuit brought four years ago by nearly two-thirds of the state's school districts.