Texas Congressional Redistricting Maps: Before and After

State lawmakers on Tuesday proposed revised U.S. House districts as part of decennial redistricting. The new map includes four additional districts thanks to Texas' robust population growth. Republicans now control 23 of Texas' 32 seats. This map could boost that advantage to 26 seats. Use the slider over each image to toggle left and right to see the changes — and how they would have been affected in the 2008 presidential race, with blue shades representing support for President Barack Obama and red districts reflecting support for U.S. Sen. John McCain. See a related story or see background information on our redistricting topic page. Or view interactive maps of the before and after versions.

STATEWIDE: The proposed map adds four open seats, including a new district west of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. A second district stretches from San Antonio to Austin, and another includes a "jumbo shrimp"-shaped district above Harris County and its suburbs. The latter district stretches from Lavaca County to the Rio Grande Valley:

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BEXAR/TRAVIS COUNTIES: U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, is the big loser so far, hemorrhaging 60,000 Obama voters from 2008. His proposed district would have supported McCain by 56 percent. His current district backed Obama with 58 percent of the vote. A newly drawn district stretching between the counties would have voted 60 percent for Obama:

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TARRANT/DALLAS COUNTIES: Lawmakers added a new district in in Tarrant, Parker and Wise counties:

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WEST TEXAS: The new district should improve the chance that freshman U.S. Rep. Francisco "Quico" Canseco, R-San Antonio, retains the seat he captured last year from Democratic Rep. Ciro Rodriguez. The district voted narrowly for Obama in 2008. As proposed, McCain would have won with 51 percent.

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HARRIS COUNTY: Lawmakers added this oddly shaped district north of Houston that would have voted for McCain by a wide margin:

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THE VALLEY: The new map also helps freshman Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Corpus Christi, whose new district moves north up the Coastal Bend and out of the Rio Grande Valley, turning a swing district into one that leans Republican. Obama won the current district with 53 percent of the vote. The new boundaries are drawn such that McCain would have won with 58 percent. A new district stretching from Lavaca Country to Cameron County is strongly Democratic.

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