The Midday Brief: Top Texas Headlines for June 14, 2011

Gov. Rick Perry speaking to reporters alongside House Speaker Joe Straus, center, and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst during a post-session press conference at the Texas Capitol on May 30, 2011.
Gov. Rick Perry speaking to reporters alongside House Speaker Joe Straus, center, and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst during a post-session press conference at the Texas Capitol on May 30, 2011.

Your afternoon reading: Perry requests sit-down with Wall Street Journal editorial board, says voters want more options in Republican field; Gibbs says Perry should run

Rick Perry Says Voters Want More Options in GOP Field

Texas Governor Rick Perry carries his bags off a private plane at  the San Antonio International Airport on November 1, 2010.
Texas Governor Rick Perry carries his bags off a private plane at the San Antonio International Airport on November 1, 2010.

Gov. Rick Perry, in New York for a speech that’s fueling speculation about a possible run for the White House, said today that voters seem hungry for more candidates to pick from in the presidential contest. Perry, in an interview with the Tribune, said there's still ample time to get in the race. 

 

Video: In First Major GOP Debate, Paul Gets Feisty

Post GOP debate interview with U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, on June 14, 2011.
Post GOP debate interview with U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, on June 14, 2011.

As everyone waits for a certain Texan to announce whether he plans to run for president, another Texan made his intentions clear Monday night by participating — in feisty fashion — in the first major GOP primary debate.

In Texas Mayoral Races, Voters Can't Be Bothered

Dallas Mayoral candidate David Kunkle speaks during a televised debate flanked by opponents Mike Rawlings and Ron Natinsky at Southern Methodist University on April 19 2011.
Dallas Mayoral candidate David Kunkle speaks during a televised debate flanked by opponents Mike Rawlings and Ron Natinsky at Southern Methodist University on April 19 2011.

It would be nice if the two largest cities in Texas’ largest metropolitan area were fired up about the June 18 runoffs that will determine their next mayors. But about the only thing voters in Dallas and Fort Worth have been engaged in is a collective yawn.