TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 7/2/12

Grissom's analysis of misconduct by prosecutors and Murphy's interactive guide to the data and documents behind it, Aguilar on Mexico's presidential election and the official counting, Batheja and Root on donor vetting in the U.S. Senate race, Galbraith on what the drought has done to the Ogallala Aquifer, Hamilton queries education experts on STEM, M. Smith's cheat sheet to guide you through the state's school finance lawsuits and Dehn's latest Weekend Insider on runoff elections and prosecutors: The best of our best from July 2 to 6, 2012.

Soot is an Underrated Threat, Texas Scientists Say

Robert J. Griffin, a soot expert at Rice University in Houston, in his on-campus lab on Wednesday, June 20, 2012.
Robert J. Griffin, a soot expert at Rice University in Houston, in his on-campus lab on Wednesday, June 20, 2012.

Soot gets less attention in Texas than the big daddy of air pollution, ozone. But scientists say that it is a growing threat for Texans, and the Environmental Protection Agency is tightening standards.

Ballot Count Shows Peña Nieto Remains Ahead

Election officials in Mexico are moving forward with the official count of the ballots cast in Sunday’s presidential election. Early results indicate that Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or the PRI, remains ahead of his challengers.

Why STEM Matters: Educators and Experts Sound Off

Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District superintendent Daniel King speaks to graduates from Options High School, College Career & Technology Academy and Teen-Age Parenting Program High School during their graduation ceremony December 16, 2010 at the San Juan Middle School Auditorium in San Juan, Texas.
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District superintendent Daniel King speaks to graduates from Options High School, College Career & Technology Academy and Teen-Age Parenting Program High School during their graduation ceremony December 16, 2010 at the San Juan Middle School Auditorium in San Juan, Texas.

“STEM,” an acronym for “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math,” is a term that is becoming increasingly common across education circles. But why is it so important? We put the question to several key Texans in the field.