Ross Ramsey Executive Editor

Ross Ramsey is executive editor and co-founder of The Texas Tribune. Before joining the Tribune, Ross was editor and co-owner of Texas Weekly for 15 years. He did a 28-month stint in government as associate deputy comptroller for policy and director of communications with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Before that, he reported for the Houston Chronicle from its Austin bureau and for the Dallas Times Herald, first on the business desk in Dallas and later as its Austin bureau chief, and worked as a Dallas-based freelance business writer, writing for regional and national magazines and newspapers. Ross got his start in journalism in broadcasting, covering news for radio stations in Denton and Dallas.

Recent Contributions

Analysis: Primaries Could Hush Reps. Stickland, Martinez Fischer

State Reps. Jonathan Stickland (left), R-Bedford, and Trey Martinez Fischer, D-San Antonio, are seen as gadflies by many of their colleagues in the Texas House. Both are locked in tough 2016 primary battles.
State Reps. Jonathan Stickland (left), R-Bedford, and Trey Martinez Fischer, D-San Antonio, are seen as gadflies by many of their colleagues in the Texas House. Both are locked in tough 2016 primary battles.

Republican Jonathan Stickland and Democrat Trey Martinez Fischer, the noisiest pot-stirrers in the Texas House, are in tough March 1 primary contests. Each man is his own best argument, and his worst one.

The Election Hotlist for the 2016 Texas Primaries

Texas Weekly

For our recurring list of the most competitive races in Texas statewide, congressional and legislative elections, we lifted the color scheme from the inventors of the federal terror watch, ranking races by the threat to each incumbent, to the incumbent party, or just by the level of interest and heat generated.

Analysis: Is Attorney General Ken Paxton Feeling Lucky?

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is shown at a news conference in Austin on Jan. 13, 2016, to announce a new unit of the attorney general’s office dedicated to combating human trafficking.
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is shown at a news conference in Austin on Jan. 13, 2016, to announce a new unit of the attorney general’s office dedicated to combating human trafficking.

It’s possible to imagine a way for the attorney general to raise money for a legal defense fund, but it’s perilous without a favorable advisory opinion from ethics regulators. And they decided this week not to approve such an opinion.

Analysis: Waiting for Answers From Iowa’s Raucous Caucus

Melody Perez (left) of San Antonio and her daughter waited for the arrival of Ted Cruz's campaign bus in Emmetsburg, Iowa, during a campaign stop on Jan. 29, 2016.
Melody Perez (left) of San Antonio and her daughter waited for the arrival of Ted Cruz's campaign bus in Emmetsburg, Iowa, during a campaign stop on Jan. 29, 2016.

The first-in-the-nation tally of regular voters intrudes on the fabulous speculation and fun we’ve all been having so far during the 2016 presidential campaign. The air guitar players on the political stage will soon be forced to sit down or move to the back.

Analysis: The Death of Taxes on Illegal Drugs in Texas

Sample tax stamps for controlled substances and "marihuana" available for sale until last year from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts.
Sample tax stamps for controlled substances and "marihuana" available for sale until last year from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts.

Until the most recent legislative session, the state had a tax on illegal drugs, adding tax evasion to the list of things that could put buyers and sellers into jail. Those drugs remain illegal, but the transactions are now tax-free.

Analysis: Legislators Seeking a More Efficient Approach to Jail Policies

State Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, chairman of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee, is shown during a Sept. 22, 2015, committee hearing.
State Sen. John Whitmire, D-Houston, chairman of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee, is shown during a Sept. 22, 2015, committee hearing.

The “lock-them-up-and-throw-away-the-key” crowd has given way to another wave — across party lines, by the way — that’s trying to rework everything from whom police take to jail to who remains there overnight.

The Election Hotlist for the 2016 Texas Primaries

Texas Weekly

For our recurring list of the most competitive races in Texas statewide, congressional and legislative elections, we lifted the color scheme from the inventors of the federal terror watch, ranking races by the threat to each incumbent, to the incumbent party, or just by the level of interest and heat generated.