Reeve Hamilton Reporter

Reeve Hamilton covers higher education and politics for The Texas Tribune and hosts the Tribune's weekly podcast. His writing has also appeared in Texas Monthly and The Texas Observer. Born in Houston and raised in Massachusetts, he has a bachelor's degree in English from Vanderbilt University.

Recent Contributions

Higher Ed Chair Seliger Tackles New Post With Open Mind

State Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, meets with his chief of staff, Ginger Averitt, at their Capitol office on October 16, 2012.
State Sen. Kel Seliger, R-Amarillo, meets with his chief of staff, Ginger Averitt, at their Capitol office on October 16, 2012.

The higher education background of state Sen. Kel Seliger, the new Senate Higher Education Committee chairman, is pretty thin, particularly when compared with that of his predecessor. But he says he's "learning a lot very rapidly."

Branch Calls for More Outcomes-Based Higher Ed Funding

Rep. Dan Branch R-Dallas, speaks with Rep. Todd Hunter R-Corpus Christi and Rep. Tom Craddick R-Midland on House floor during budget debate April 1st, 2011
Rep. Dan Branch R-Dallas, speaks with Rep. Todd Hunter R-Corpus Christi and Rep. Tom Craddick R-Midland on House floor during budget debate April 1st, 2011

Gov. Rick Perry on Monday renewed a call for 10 percent of state higher education funding to be based on institutions' graduation totals. House Higher Ed Chairman Rep. Dan Branch, R-Dallas, wants to take that proposal even further.

Like $10,000 Degree, Perry Tuition Plan May Not Fit All

Texas Science Scholar Wesley Powers, a junior chemistry major from Midland, Texas, works on a 3-hour-long lab experiment at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas. Powers is obtaining his chemistry degree in order to attend pharmacy school.
Texas Science Scholar Wesley Powers, a junior chemistry major from Midland, Texas, works on a 3-hour-long lab experiment at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas. Powers is obtaining his chemistry degree in order to attend pharmacy school.

As with Gov. Rick Perry’s $10,000 degree proposal, his latest call for reducing the price of college — locking in tuition for four years — may prove difficult to implement uniformly in a state as diverse as Texas.