Julián Aguilar Reporter

Julián Aguilar reports on politics and border affairs from the Texas-Mexico border. His focuses include immigration reform and enforcement, voter ID, international trade, border security, and the drug trade. His political coverage has included local, legislative and congressional races in Texas, as well as local and national elections in Mexico. Before joining the Tribune, he was a freelance writer for the Fort Worth Weekly; a government and crime reporter for the Laredo Morning Times; and a political writer for the Rio Grande Guardian. A native of El Paso, he has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Texas and a master's degree in journalism from the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas.

Recent Contributions

Legislature Considers Softer Line on Immigration

A U.S. Border Patrol helicopter patrols over the Paso del Norte International Bridge between El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico on Tuesday March 27, 2012.
A U.S. Border Patrol helicopter patrols over the Paso del Norte International Bridge between El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico on Tuesday March 27, 2012.
Texas Weekly

Two years after legislation to ban "sanctuary cities" was made a top priority, immigration legislation is barely discussed at the state Capitol. It’s put some lawmakers in a weird spot — especially when some of their own recently came out in support of what’s  a no-no in politics — amnesty. 

Analyst: Look Beyond Border Apprehension Data

A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol boat heads south in the Rio Grande River between Hidalgo and Los Ebanos in Hidalgo County, TX on routine patrol August 25, 2007.  Texas lawmen engaged Mexican drug smugglers in a border gunbattle on June 9, 2011.
A U.S. Customs and Border Patrol boat heads south in the Rio Grande River between Hidalgo and Los Ebanos in Hidalgo County, TX on routine patrol August 25, 2007. Texas lawmen engaged Mexican drug smugglers in a border gunbattle on June 9, 2011.

Apprehensions on the Texas-Mexico border by federal agents are often cited as proof that border security is either working or not working. The former director of Immigration and Naturalization Services says those statistics have holes but should still be considered in the debate.