Becca Aaronson Reporter

Becca Aaronson reports on health care and develops data interactives for The Texas Tribune. After an internship in fall 2010, she was hired by the Tribune. Becca is a native of Austin who graduated from Scripps College in Claremont, Calif., with a bachelor's degree in cultural theory.

Recent Contributions

Perry, Obamacare and the Uninsured

A patient at The People's Community Clinic pays her bill as the cashier’s desk.  The Community Health Assistance Program, a program that helps Texans get access to insurance, will run out of federal grant money in a few weeks.
A patient at The People's Community Clinic pays her bill as the cashier’s desk. The Community Health Assistance Program, a program that helps Texans get access to insurance, will run out of federal grant money in a few weeks.
Texas Weekly

In the same week that the U.S. Census Bureau released new data showing Texas again ranks highest for the rate of people without health insurance, Gov. Rick Perry quietly laid out his next efforts to derail Obamacare.

Watson Responds to Perry's Move to Regulate Insurance Navigators

Gov. Rick Perry attends a groundbreaking ceremony for the CRIT Texas Teletón USA children's rehabilitation center in San Antonio on Aug. 6, 2013.
Gov. Rick Perry attends a groundbreaking ceremony for the CRIT Texas Teletón USA children's rehabilitation center in San Antonio on Aug. 6, 2013.

In a letter Thursday, state Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, says Gov. Rick Perry's move to establish strict rules for so-called health insurance navigators defies the intent of a law legislators passed this year.

In State Records, Little Evidence to Back Abortion Law

Hallways like this one at Whole Woman's Health will have to be widened as part of the new legislation for abortion clinics to become ASCs.
Hallways like this one at Whole Woman's Health will have to be widened as part of the new legislation for abortion clinics to become ASCs.

In their successful push for new abortion regulations, abortion opponents said conditions at existing facilities were unsafe. But a Texas Tribune review of recent state records showed little evidence to suggest the facilities were putting patients in imminent danger.

Outbreaks Make a Case for Vaccinations

Gabrielle Davis, 16, receives a shot at the Immunization Collaboration of Tarrant County in Fort Worth on Aug. 30, 2013.
Gabrielle Davis, 16, receives a shot at the Immunization Collaboration of Tarrant County in Fort Worth on Aug. 30, 2013.

A measles outbreak at a church and soaring rates of whooping cough across the state are drawing renewed calls for immunization legislation, which medical professionals argue would help the state prevent public health crises.

Despite Additional Dollars, Doctor Shortage Hard to Fix

Plastic surgery residents Dr. Kristi L. Hustak, left, and Dr. Surjit S. Rai, center,  checking a patients skin graft with the Faculty Plastic Surgeon Dr. John Bauer, right, at UTMB's John Sealy Hospital in Galveston, Monday, August 19, 2013.
Plastic surgery residents Dr. Kristi L. Hustak, left, and Dr. Surjit S. Rai, center, checking a patients skin graft with the Faculty Plastic Surgeon Dr. John Bauer, right, at UTMB's John Sealy Hospital in Galveston, Monday, August 19, 2013.

Texas lawmakers invested millions of new dollars in the 2013 legislative session to address a looming physician shortage, but the medical community remains concerned that Texas has no long-term solution.