Becca Aaronson News Apps Developer

Becca Aaronson develops news applications and works on special investigative projects for The Texas Tribune. As a native of Austin with a bachelor’s degree in cultural theory from Scripps College in Claremont, Calif., Becca joined the Tribune in 2010 with a passion for building a new media model that promotes civic engagement. She was promoted in 2012 to cover health care for the Tribune, during which time she was nationally recognized for her coverage of women’s health and abortion politics. A founding member of the Tribune’s news apps team, Becca left the health care beat in 2014 to work on news apps full-time.

Recent Contributions

Could Texas Follow in Florida's Footsteps?

Governor Rick Perry offers words of advice to new and veteran House members during a speech on the opening of the 83rd Legislative Session on January 8, 2013
Governor Rick Perry offers words of advice to new and veteran House members during a speech on the opening of the 83rd Legislative Session on January 8, 2013
Texas Weekly

When Florida Gov. Rick Scott reversed his stance on Medicaid expansion this week, many Texans were left wondering: If Florida can reach a compromise with the feds, could Texas?

House Republicans File Fetal Pain Bill

Gov. Rick Perry at a press conference announcing his support for Texas Right to Life's Preborn Pain Bill in Houston on Dec. 11, 2012.
Gov. Rick Perry at a press conference announcing his support for Texas Right to Life's Preborn Pain Bill in Houston on Dec. 11, 2012.

Two House Republicans filed a “fetal pain” bill on Tuesday that would ban abortions 20 weeks after conception. Gov. Rick Perry has publicly expressed support for the measure. 

Restoring Family Planning Services Through Primary Care

Medical assistant Alesia Bolden checks Nereyda Penaloza's vital signs during a visit to Women's Health at CommUnityCare, a federally qualified health center, in Austin, Texas.
Medical assistant Alesia Bolden checks Nereyda Penaloza's vital signs during a visit to Women's Health at CommUnityCare, a federally qualified health center, in Austin, Texas.

Republican legislators have proposed adding $100 million to a state-run primary care program specifically for women’s health services, which could avert a political fight over subsidizing specialty family planning clinics.

Updated: Despite Moratorium, CPRIT Board Moves Forward

Associate Professor Sung Jung uses mass spectrometers to measure protein in cancer cells at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Monday, February 11, 2013. Baylor College of Medicine received a $6 million CPRIT grant to purchase advanced laboratory infrastructure and pay researchers to measure all of the metabolites and proteins in cancer cells at the same time.
Associate Professor Sung Jung uses mass spectrometers to measure protein in cancer cells at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Monday, February 11, 2013. Baylor College of Medicine received a $6 million CPRIT grant to purchase advanced laboratory infrastructure and pay researchers to measure all of the metabolites and proteins in cancer cells at the same time.

The oversight board for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas has decided to move forward on contract negotiations for $183 million in approved grants that have been stalled by a moratorium.