Aman Batheja Reporter

Aman Batheja worked for eight years at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, most of that time covering state and local politics. A native of Cedarhurst, New York, he has an undergraduate degree in journalism and psychology from New York University and a master's in economics from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Recent Contributions

Reused Wastewater Key to Trinity River's Survival

An official with Fort Worth's water department on steps that lead down to the Trinity River, where unreclaimed water from the wastewater treatment plant gets dumped.
An official with Fort Worth's water department on steps that lead down to the Trinity River, where unreclaimed water from the wastewater treatment plant gets dumped.

By virtue of its proximity to three major Texas cities, nearly half of the state’s population relies on the Trinity River for some of its water needs. 

TxDOT May Get Extra Money for Damaged Roads

A driver maneuvers around a badly damaged portion of the IH 37 frontage road south of FM 99 in Live Oak County, TX on Firday, August 16, 2013
A driver maneuvers around a badly damaged portion of the IH 37 frontage road south of FM 99 in Live Oak County, TX on Firday, August 16, 2013

State lawmakers are expected to give the Texas Department of Transportation an extra $250 million for work in counties affected by the drilling boom, but that likely won't stop some paved roads from being converted to gravel.

The Politics of High-Speed Rail in Texas

The JR Central N700 Series, a Japanese Shinkansen bullet train developed by two railway companies in Japan.
The JR Central N700 Series, a Japanese Shinkansen bullet train developed by two railway companies in Japan.
Texas Weekly

Details of an expensive, privately funded high-speed rail project connecting Dallas and Houston will come out next year, just in time for candidates for office to weigh in. 

A Maverick Tries to Stay in the Picture

Debra Medina hosts a monthly potluck with Tea Party activists at her home in Wharton on Sept. 6, 2013. Medina is exploring a run for state comptroller.
Debra Medina hosts a monthly potluck with Tea Party activists at her home in Wharton on Sept. 6, 2013. Medina is exploring a run for state comptroller.

If Debra Medina doesn't run for comptroller in 2014, it will be because of a lack of money, not will. The former gubernatorial candidate said grass-roots supporters can't contribute enough funds to wage a serious statewide bid.