For State Politicians, BLM Dispute is Fertile Turf

State Rep. James Frank has been hearing from constituents since February about goings-on along the Red River: The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, citing a series of court rulings dating to the 1920s, had decided that a 116-mile stretch of land belonged to the federal government.

The roughly 90,000 acres included property long ago deeded to residents who had raised crops and cattle and paid taxes on it.

Questions had been swirling in North Texas since December, when BLM representatives came to discuss updates to its resource management plans in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas — how the land would ...

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