TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 12/9/13

The candidates have filed for the 2014 elections, and our election brackets — an idea lifted from the NCAA's March Madness basketball brackets — are back. We'll update these as officials from the state and large-county parties update their own lists.

U.S. Rep. Steve Stockman, R-Friendswood, has filed to run against U.S. Sen. John Cornyn in the March GOP primary, joining at least eight other hopefuls vying for the senior senator's seat.

Some counties are happier than others after the Texas Department of Transportation released estimates of state aid to help fix roads damaged amid the state's oil and gas boom.

Efforts to ban double dipping by longtime politicians went nowhere in the last legislative session. That could change now that the two leading candidates for governor have expressed support for banning the controversial practice.

Many Rio Grande Valley residents enrolling for health coverage through the Affordable Care Act opt for the paper application, largely avoiding the federal online marketplace. But the paper process poses its own challenges.

 

Dallas has significantly tightened its drilling rules, following years of debate about what natural gas production should look like inside its city limits — if it comes at all.

University of Texas at Austin President Bill Powers is keeping his job — for now — following a Thursday meeting of the University of Texas System Board of Regents, at which there was a chance of his future being put to a vote.

An Austin lawyer turned yogi hopes to make yoga commonplace behind bars in Texas. But financial and administrative challenges lie ahead. 

A West Texas utility company and a coalition of neighborhood activists have reached an agreement that paves the way for the construction of a natural gas power plant in far east El Paso County.

As Texas continues to rebuild the state’s network of family planning providers, state Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, sees the potential for the state to further expand women’s health services.

With the exclusion of Planned Parenthood clinics from the Texas Women's Health Program, records show claims for birth control and wellness exams dropped, as did enrollment numbers.

 

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