Better Hepatitis Treatment Costly for Prisons

Tattooing is ubiquitous behind bars, despite — or perhaps because of — the fact that it is banned.

“It’s just unbelievable how creative they can be,” said Michele Deitch, a prisons expert at the University of Texas at Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs. “They can jerry-rig pens to become needles. They use the dyes in paper products.”

But the practice carries with it more than the risk of punishment — it can also spread hepatitis C.

The prison population is particularly prone to this viral disease, which is transmitted largely through infected blood and can lead to liver cirrhosis and ...

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