TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 2/6/11

A brawl is brewing in South Texas, but this one has nothing to do with cartels or drug smuggling — it's an environmental battle over a proposed surface-mining site that some Eagle Pass residents worry will ruin their way of life.

A report released Wednesday by the Texas comptroller's office looks at the impact of the current drought and other scenarios.

Judge Sid Harle said Friday he will recommend that Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Wallace Jefferson convene a court of inquiry to review a slew of evidence against former Williamson County prosecutor Ken Anderson.

When the University of Texas System regents met in San Antonio Wednesday and Thursday, accountability was back on the agenda, in the form of more frequent performance reviews for tenured professors and criminal record checks for certain employees.

Use our news application to search federal campaign donations to Rick Perry in 2011 and see who has financially supported his now-defunct presidential bid.

 

Use our news application to search federal campaign expenditures made by Rick Perry's presidential campaign in 2011 and see how the governor has spent his money at the beginning of his first national political race and in the buildup to the Iowa caucuses.

Federal judges told redistricting lawyers Friday afternoon to redouble their efforts to reach a quick settlement — by next week — on interim political maps for the state's congressional and legislative elections.

The Texas Medical Board, this week considering rules governing adult stem cell treatments, has had no shortage of input — from Gov. Rick Perry and the doctor who injected him with his own stem cells last summer, among others.

Legislation cracking down on insider trading by members of Congress hasn’t landed on the floor of the U.S. House yet, but it’s already become a hot topic in Congressional District 10, which Michael McCaul of Austin represents.

With the more-rigorous STAAR testing system set to debut this year, a backlash appears to building against standardized testing in the state. And some legislators are mulling how to postpone some of the tests’ consequences for students.

State Sen. Kirk Watson, D-Austin, is on a mission to build a stand-alone medical school in Austin, and he's taking an unconventional route to get there.

 

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