TribWeek: Top Texas News for the Week of 10/10/11

Our interactive table shows how much federal stimulus funding was awarded to state agencies, how it was received and spent, and the number of jobs created or retained with the money, according to quarterly reports filed by recipients of stimulus funds.

A new law imposing citizenship restrictions on deputy and volunteer voter registrars has voting rights groups worried that fewer Texans — in particular, fewer minorities — will cast a ballot next year.

The head of the UT's Energy Institute, Raymond Orbach, is wading into politicized territory with a new paper aiming to debunk eight "myths" about climate change.

The stage is set for an epic political battle between two El Paso political powerhouses: an established incumbent congressman touting his seniority and accomplishments and a young former councilman in the city’s “progressive” camp.

Thomas Lindsay, recently selected to head  the Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Center for Higher Education, attributes the state's growing awareness of higher education to the discussion begun by the TPPF.

 

Our latest Census 2010 interactive visualizes data released by the United States Census Bureau in Summary File 1. It's a more detailed view that shows a broad range of information, from the average number of children living in an area, to a breakdown of household types.

The easiest way to win an election is to have the votes. The next easiest way is to change the rules of the election. Some political folks, inside and outside the Texas Senate, are looking at the rules.

Rick Perry didn’t blow it or commit any serious gaffes, but in his latest debate the Texas governor found himself in a position that seemed unimaginable even a few weeks ago: largely out of the spotlight and struggling for airtime.



 

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