The Midday Brief: June 21, 2010

Barbara Ann Radnofsky campaign photo
Barbara Ann Radnofsky campaign photo

Your afternoon reading:

"Democrat Barbara Ann Radnofsky today is urging the state to sue some of the top players on Wall Street for helping cause the financial collapse." — Barbara Radnofsky wants Texas to sue Wall Street, Trail Blazers

"The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board  — a federal investigative body best known for looking into accidents at refineries and chemical plants — will conduct an investigation of the deadly drilling rig accident that led to the massive oil spill that is spreading over the Gulf of Mexico." — Chemical Safety Board to investigate Deepwater Horizon accident, NewsWatch: Energy

"South Carolina's unexpected Democratic nominee for the US Senate, mystery man Alvin Greene, says he wants to play golf with Barack Obama. But in Texas, another surprise Democratic primary winner, congressional nominee Kesha Rogers, wants to impeach the President." — Texas Dems Grapple With Their Own Alvin Greene, Time

"Gov. Rick Perry says his first trip to China has led to increased exposure for Texas in Asia." — Gov. Rick Perry says China trip promotes Texas in Asia, The Associated Press

New in The Texas Tribune:

"During last weekend's GOP convention in Dallas, the chief consultant to Rick Perry's re-election campaign talked to the Tribune about the strategy behind his strategy, why many people believe a Perry run for president is coming, the mistake that Bill White is making, the canard of the "39 Percent Governor" and the whole states-versus-the-feds thing." — Dave Carney: The TT Interview

"Dozens of Texas border counties now check the immigration status of anyone who ends up in jail, removing thousands of criminal suspects from the country. But detainees are also being deported for minor infractions — including some who are never formally charged." — The Crackdown

"Thanks to a 2007 state law and federal stimulus grants, smart-grid projects are proliferating across Texas, allowing customers to monitor their electricity usage and control costs. Some utilities are saving money, too." — Get Smart

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